What is Thrush?

The medical term for thrush is candidiasis. It is called by a yeast called Candida Albicans.

Many women have Candida in their vagina without it causing any symptoms. Vaginal secretions and “friendly” vaginal bacteria keep the fungus under control. Problems arise when the natural balance in the vagina is upset and Candida multiplies.

Vaginal thrush isn’t an STI, but it can sometimes be passed on to men during sex. This means that if you have thrush, it’s best to avoid having sex until you’ve completed a course of treatment and the infection has cleared up. Thrush can also be triggered by sex, and this is more likely if you have trouble relaxing and producing lubrication during intercourse.

What is commonly affected

Among all thrush vaginal thrush is very common. Around three-quarters of women will have a bout of thrush at some point in their lives. Up to half of these will have thrush more than once.

Thrush most commonly affects women in their twenties and thirties. It is less common in girls who have not yet started their periods and women who have been through the menopause.

Who is prone to get it?

  • are pregnant
  • low immunity
  • take a
  • have uncontrolled diabetes

What is the Treatment ?

In most cases, thrush can be easily treated with either a tablet that you take orally or anti-thrush pessaries, which are inserted into your vagina. Anti-thrush creams are also available.

Anti-thrush remedies are available either on prescription from your doctor or over the counter from a pharmacy.

Treatment works well for most , and vaginal thrush usually clears up within a few days.

However, about 1 in 20 women may have recurrent thrush (4 or more episodes in a year). Around 1 in 100 women may have thrush almost constantly. In these instances, longer courses of treatment, for up to 6 months, may be needed.